Orthodontics Near Broomfield, COWe are proud to offer many different technologies to patients near Broomfield so that you can get straight teeth in a way that works for you. We would be glad to go over all of your options so that together we can make the right decision for you and your mouth.

We also know how scary it can be to go to the dentist and orthodontist. Many people fear coming in, so we do everything that we can to provide a calm and comfortable environment. Our staff is great at what they do. They are here to discuss any of your concerns and put you at ease.

There is also nothing worse than feeling like you are not able to discuss your teeth with your orthodontist. We don’t want you to feel that way, so we are all here to help answer any questions you may have, no matter how silly you think they are. We can assure you that we have heard most of them already!

Broomfield Orthodontic Care

Broomfield, officially the City and County of Broomfield is a consolidated city and county in the U.S. state of Colorado. Broomfield has a consolidated city and county government which operates under Article XX, Sections 10-13 of the Constitution of the State of Colorado. The population was 55,889 at the 2010 United States Census. Broomfield is the 16th most populous municipality and the 13th most populous county in Colorado.

Broomfield is a part of the Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area.

The municipality of Broomfield was incorporated in 1961 in the southeastern corner of Boulder County. While it is unsure how it received its name, most researchers guess it’s from the broomcorn grown in the area, a tall sorghum that farmers sold for use as brooms and whisk brooms. Over the next three decades, the city grew through annexations, many of which crossed the county line into three adjacent counties: Adams, Jefferson and Weld. In the 1990s, city leaders began to push for the creation of a separate county to avoid the inefficiencies of dealing with four separate court districts, four different county seats, and four separate county sales tax bases. It also had longstanding political differences with Boulder County[clarification needed] which impelled it to separate. Broomfield reasoned that it could provide services more responsively under its own county government, and sought an amendment to the Colorado State Constitution to create a new county. The amendment was passed in 1998, after which a three-year transition period followed. On November 15, 2001, Broomfield County became the 64th, newest, and smallest county of Colorado. It is also the newest county in the United States (if county equivalents are not included).